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Can Trigger Finger Be Treated with Conservative Methods?

Can Trigger Finger Be Treated with Conservative Methods?

Stenosing tenosynovitis, commonly known as trigger finger, is inflammation in the tendons in your fingers and thumb that causes them to lock in a bent position facing your palm. In the flexed position, it looks like you’re ready to pull a trigger, hence the name. 

When you straighten the finger, you may feel pain or hear a pop. The stiffness occurs because the space between the tendon and its surrounding sheath decreases, hindering the sliding motion. 

Our experts at The Woodlands Sports Medicine Centre in The Woodlands and Conroe, Texas, frequently treat hand injuries like trigger finger. Read on to learn more about conservative measures that our team uses to help you get much-needed relief. 

Understanding the causes and risk factors for trigger finger 

Trigger finger is caused by years of cumulative damage to your tendon from overuse or forceful use of your thumb and fingers. It’s most likely to occur if you’re getting older, you suffer from diabetes, gout, or arthritis, or if you’ve had surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome.

Certain occupations and hobbies can also increase your risk of developing trigger finger, particularly those involving repetitive finger movements like musicians, gardeners, and people who work with hand tools regularly.

Managing your symptoms depends on your risk factors as well. For example, if you are a musician who uses string instruments, taking frequent breaks as you practice may be a good start, as your issues are most likely caused by overuse of your fingers. 

What are the symptoms of trigger finger?

In addition to pain, you might also experience:

Unfortunately, trigger finger symptoms don’t resolve on their own and usually worsen over time.

Nonsurgical methods to relieve trigger finger pain

Nonsurgical treatments for trigger finger include:

Your provider may also recommend corticosteroid injections to decrease the inflammation, relieve the pain, and restore movement to your finger or thumb. 

When medical intervention is necessary

If conservative measures don’t work, surgery may be necessary to straighten your finger and alleviate your pain. Your provider guides you through all the conservative options and only recommends surgery as a last resort.

If you have symptoms of trigger finger, our experts can help. To get started with a consultation, call the office closest to you to schedule an appointment or request one online. 

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